Kinship and Closeness | Nov 4 @ 4pm

OCAD University
100 McCaul St.
$5-$15 suggested (no one turned away)

$
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Kinship and Closeness

curated by Adrienne Huard for MediaQueer.ca + TQFF 2018

November 4 | 4:00pm
@ OCAD University
Sliding scale $5-15
(no one turned away for lack of funds)

Kinship and Closeness is a Two-Spirit program of short films that encourages viewers to redefine borders within relationships. Through genuine demonstrations of affection and care, this program hopes to promote and highlight the necessity of kinship amongst our* nations. Through storytelling, language, intimacy, ancestral teachings and gender bending, these Two-Spirit works can begin the process of decolonizing perspectives of love, gender, sexuality and partnerships while elevating Indigenous voices and facilitating methods of healing.

These works encourage a queering of time through an Indigenous lens, allowing for a non-linear perception of time. Colonial boundaries between the past, present and future become unwoven. Alternatively, these short films flow through various representations of Indigenous culture while reclaiming agency our own bodies and minds through abstract moments in time.

Approximate running time: 70 minutes.

PROGRAM

Water into Fire
dir. Zachery Longboy | 1994 | 11 min
Longboy outs himself as a First Nations FAG – who is living with HIV – hoping to sever attached preconception of two spirited peoples. In a contemplative search, the artist recollects how HIV/AIDS has affected him and his surrounding community, revealing a strength through loss.

Aviliaq: Entwined
dir. Alethea Arnaquq-Baril | 2014 | 15 min
In the 1950s, two Inuit women attempt to protect their relationship when pressure from their community forces them to marry men.

Paskwâw Mostos Iskwêsis (Buffalo Girl)
dir. Howard Adler, Candy Renae Fox, & Leo Koziol | 2017 | 4 min
Set in the backdrop of colonial violence and the extermination of the buffalo. The Genocide of the buffalo parallels the loss of Queer Indigenous and Two-Spirit knowledge. In this film a Buffalo Spirit transforms into an Nēhiyaw Iskwesis (a young Cree women), and a ghost like apparition sings Maori songs and underscores the links between colonialism on Indigenous peoples across the globe.

Buffalo Boy: Don’t Look East
dir. Adrian Stimson | 2012 | 7 min
In recreating tropes from the “Wild West” as a camp spectacle, Stimson’s work employs camp as resistance to colonialism. Created for an exhibition at the Mass MOCA, this short from Stimson’s Wild West series shows the Sisika (Blackfoot) artist uncannily strutting his stuff along the canals of Venice (Italy).

Bebeschwendaam (Hard Femme Intimacy)
dir. Dayna Danger | 2017 | 6 min
2Spirit/Queer, Metis/Saulteaux/Polish visual artist raised in so called Winnipeg, MB. Bebeschwendaam challenges the segregation between intimacy and kinship as a method of decolonizing Western perceptions of love and partnerships. By demonstrating candid moments between the two central figures, this playful film dismantles the notion that affection is solely reserved for romantic, heteronormative couplings. This film has been shown at Concordia’s VA Gallery in 2017 and Gallery 101 in Ottawa.

Tsanizid (Wake Up)
dir. Beric Manywounds | 2017 | 6 min
“Wake Up” is a new dance film by Beric Manywounds.

Future Nation
dir. Kent Monkman | 2005 | 16 min
Against the terrifying backdrop of a biological apocalypse, a Native teenager, Brian, comes out to his older sister, Faith, and homophobic brother, Charles. Conflict erupts among them as desperate survivors from the city seek refuge on the rez from the horrors of a “megapox” epidemic that is quickly devastating urban populations across North America. Through a perilous journey to the city for food, where they rescue Brian’s “friend” in the process (an outrageous drag queen named Tonya), the hungry and frightened youth reach acceptance by facing down their fears.

2 Spirit Dreamcatcher Dot Com
dir. Thirza Cuthand | 2017 | 5 min
2 Spirit Dreamcatcher Dot Com queers and indigenizes traditional dating site advertisements. Using a Butch NDN ‘lavalife” lady (performed by director Thirza Cuthand), 2 Spirit Dreamcatcher Dot Com seduces the viewer into 2 Spirit “snagging and shacking up” with suggestions of nearby pipeline protests to take your date to, and helpful elders who will matchmake you and tell off disrespectful suitors. It’s the culturally appropriate website all single 2 Spirit people wish existed. Following up on her video “2 Spirit Introductory Special $19.99” this work examines the forces of capitalism through envisioning a “financially feasible” service for a small minority community.

 

Adrienne Huard is a Two-Spirit Anishinaabekwe writer, curator and student currently based out of Tkaronto. Her nation is Couchiching First Nations, Fort Frances, ON, and she is Turtle clan. She is a Master’s candidate at OCAD University.

Co-presented with:

Accessibility

All events are “pay what you can” and wheelchair accessible. This screening will be closed-captioned and ASL-interpreted. Both of our locations will have a pre-arranged waiting area with seating for any audience members who need it prior to the doors opening. TQFF will not be serving alcohol at the festival, and we welcome everyone living with disabilities and/or addictions,

Please contact us if you have any additional accessibility-related inquiries, requests, or needs.

Locations

November 1, 2018:
Innis Town Hall
2 Sussex Avenue, Toronto ON

November 2-4, 2018:
OCAD University
100 McCaul Street, Toronto, ON

Memberships & Festival Passes

The Toronto Queer Film Festival is a volunteer-run, artist-centered festival that is entirely supported by arts council grants and donations (no corporate sponsorships). There are no submission fees for filmmakers to apply, all events are pay what you can/no one turned away, all screenings are captioned and ASL interpreted, and proceeds from the festival are prioritized to pay artists.

We can’t do all of this without your support. Currently TQFF is reliant on community donations to reach our goals as well as to make the festival happen. Please consider becoming a member today to receive benefits and to help us continue to build a diverse and representative platform for queer and trans artists in Canada.

Full Membership $200

Includes:

  • 2 Full Festival Passes (entry to all events except workshops)
  • 2 Tickets to any year round special screenings and events (except workshops)
  • Festival poster
  • TQFF Button
  • TQFF Tote Bag
  • Complimentary Publication
  • Recognition on the Toronto Queer Film Festival list of supporters online

 

Individual Membership $60 | $40 for students/seniors/underemployed/unwaged

Includes:

  • 1 Full Festival Pass (entry to all events except workshops)
  • Festival Poster
  • TQFF Tote Bag
  • TQFF Button

The 2018 festival schedule is available here, and includes 12 screenings plus workshops, panels, and performances from November 1-4 at Innis Town Hall and OCAD University.

Click here to become a member today!